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Part A costs

How much does Part A cost?

You usually don't pay a monthly Premium for Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) coverage if you or your spouse paid Medicare taxes for a certain amount of time while working. This is sometimes called "premium-free Part A."

Most people get premium-free Part A.

You can get premium-free Part A at 65 if:

  • You already get retirement Benefits from Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board.
  • You're eligible to get Social Security or Railroad benefits but haven't filed for them yet.
  • You or your spouse had Medicare-covered government employment.

If you're under 65, you can get premium-free Part A if:

  • You got Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board disability benefits for 24 months.
  • You have End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and meet certain requirements.

Part A premiums
If you buy Part A, you'll pay up to $437 each month. If you paid Medicare taxes for less than 30 quarters, the standard Part A premium is $437. If you paid Medicare taxes for 30-39 quarters, the standard Part A premium is $240.

In most cases, if you choose to buy Part A, you must also:

  • Have Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance)
  • Pay monthly premiums for both Part A and Part B

Contact Social Security for more information about the Part A premium.

Some people automatically get Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance).

Part A late enrollment penalty

If you aren't eligible for premium-free Part A, and you don't buy it when you're first eligible, your monthly premium may go up 10%. You'll have to pay the higher premium for twice the number of years you could have had Part A, but didn't sign up.

Example

If you were eligible for Part A for 2 years but didn't sign up, you'll have to pay the higher premium for 4 years. Usually, you don't have to pay a penalty if you meet certain conditions that allow you to sign up for Part A during a special enrollment period.

If you have limited income and resources, your state may help you pay for Part A, and/or Part B. You may also qualify for Extra Help to pay for your Medicare prescription drug coverage.

Part B costs

Some people automatically get Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance), and some people need to sign up for Part B. Learn how and when you can sign up for Part B.

If you don't sign up for Part B when you're first eligible, you may have to pay a late enrollment penalty.

How much does Part B cost?

Part B premiums

You pay a premium each month for Part B. Your Part B premium will be automatically deducted from your benefit payment if you get benefits from one of these:

  • Social Security
  • Railroad Retirement Board
  • Office of Personnel Management

If you don’t get these benefit payments, you’ll get a bill.

Most people will pay the standard premium amount. If your modified adjusted gross income is above a certain amount, you may pay an Income Related Monthly Adjustment Amount (IRMAA). Medicare uses the modified adjusted gross income reported on your IRS tax return from 2 years ago. This is the most recent tax return information provided to Social Security by the IRS.

The standard Part B premium amount in 2019 is $135.50. Most people will pay the standard Part B premium amount. If your modified adjusted gross income as reported on your IRS tax return from 2 years ago is above a certain amount, you'll pay the standard premium amount and an Income Related Monthly Adjustment Amount (IRMAA). IRMAA is an extra charge added to your premium.

Get more information about your Part B premium from Social Security.

Part B deductible & coinsurance

You pay $185 per year in 2019 for your Part B Deductible. After your deductible is met, you typically pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for these:

  • Most doctor services (including most doctor services while you're a hospital inpatient)
  • Outpatient therapy
  • Durable medical equipment (DME)

Part B late enrollment penalty

In most cases, if you don't sign up for Part B when you're first eligible, you'll have to pay a late enrollment penalty. You'll have to pay this penalty for as long as you have Part B. Your monthly premium for Part B may go up 10% of the standard premium for each full 12-month period that you could have had Part B, but didn't sign up for it. Also, you may have to wait until the General Enrollment Period (from January 1 to March 31) to enroll in Part B. Coverage will start July 1 of that year.

Usually, you don't pay a late enrollment penalty if you meet certain conditions that allow you to sign up for Part B during a Special Enrollment Period.

If you have limited income and resources, your state may help you pay for Part A, and/or Part B. You may also qualify for Extra Help to pay for your Medicare prescription drug coverage.